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How to be prepared at home - First Aid Kit for Cavies There are several things you can keep on hand at home, in the event of an emergency. Some of these things are necessary for full in home treatment of minor ailments, and some are necessary for emergency care while you are trying to get a hold of your vet. In any case, no well-prepared cavy home can live comfortably without some of these supplies! Most if not all are available over the counter at your local pharmacy or feed store, while some may be purchased over the internet.

* Zimecterin horse worming paste (for mites), injectable or pour on cattle ivomec Eprinex.

* Kitten safe flea shampoo (for lice) - I prefer Zodiac kitten and puppy shampoo or Ectosoothe. Pyrethrins must be an ingredient to be affective against lice. You can also use a small animal spray good for fleas, ticks and lice, I believe 8-in-1 puts out a good product, as well as any good kitten flea powder.

* Triple antibiotic ointment or cream. This can be any good one you'd use on yourself such as Neosporin, Nolvasan Panalog, or a generic brand at the pharmacy.

* Bag Balm (baby section in grocery stores or in feed stores). This is helpful for nursing moms with 'vigorously nursing' babies, scabbing wounds, or dry irritated skin.

* Cotton swabs (q-tips) and cotton balls for cleaning out ears, administering ivermectin (q-tip that has been 'de-fluffed'), cleaning eyes or wounds.

* Eyedropper for handfeeding newborns (syringes tend to cause aspiration easily).

* Syringes with and without needles. Syringes can be 1 cc (handfeeding babies or flushing wounds), 3 cc for handfeeding larger babies and giving medicines), 5 cc for handfeeding adults, and 10 cc for other purposes. The larger the gauge of needle the smaller the size will be (ie an 18 gauge needle is actually larger in diameter than a 25 gauge needle), so for injections on pigs, I prefer 22-25 gauge needles. Eighteen gauge needles tend to leave large injection holes, and are uncomfortable for the pigs, however these are the most handy size if you have to lance an abcess.

* Johnson's baby shampoo, Suave baby shampoo, or Ectosoothe is very handy as a normal shampoo for pigs, as needed.

* Lysol concentrated disinfectant (available at RiteAid) for treating fungal problems on the skin. Also helpful, any good dandruff shampoo like Desonex, or even LymDip. Also recommended: Mycodex, tinactin or any good athlete's foot powder, cream or shampoo.

* White vinegar for fungus in the ears.

* Hydrogen peroxide for wounds or excess exudite in the ears.

* Witch hazel for small cuts and lacerations.

* Tea Tree oil or oatmeal skin remedies and shampoos for irritated or dry skin.

* Ear mite rinse for kittens, rabbits or puppies.

* Children's kaopectate, cherry flavour (for diarrhea). Also in a pinch, you can use any good 'wet tail' remedy in the small pet section of the pet store, but it won't be as affective as actual medication.

* Nutrical or Critical Care supplements, high calorie dietary supplement for animals with lethargic feeding response or for emergency feeding (use 5-10 cc syringe for administering). Most pet stores carry this in the puppy/kitten handfeeding section.

* Probiotics such as benebac, probios, or any other good source of acidophilus or lactobacillus. Always use an hour after using antibiotics.

* Terramycin opthamalic ointment for eye injuries, irritations or infections.

* Popsicle sticks (emergency splints and for viewing molars).

* Betadine, or any other good iodine surgical rinse (for cleaning out wounds or abcesses).

* Vet wrap (for splints or bandages - be careful, this tends to tighten as it's being wound up, so practice bandaging a finger first so you know how tight to make it).

* Clean sterile gauze bandages (for wound dressing and splints) and handtowels (handy for restraining as well as isolating wounded areas).

* Saline solution (rinsing eyes, mouth, and wounds) - available in the contact lens section, be sure it's ONLY sterile saline solution, not disinfecting solution! VERY different products!!!

* Vaseline or mineral oil (helpful for cleaning out boar impaction and other problems)

* Sulfa based antibiotic such as Sulmet or Septra (tribrissum).

* Vicks vaporub (handy for pneumonia or for introducing animals)

* Oxytocin (available only through your vet) for stimulating contractions in a weak or struggling pregnant sow.

* Propylene glycol, karo syrup, pedialyte and molasses for immediate nourishment, energy and calcium in struggling toxic sows.

* Wheat bran for pregnant sows

* KMR (Kitten Milk Replacement), Esbilac (Puppy milk replacement) or Ensure for handfeeding babies.

* Liquid Calcium (without Magnesium if possible) and Vitamin C liquid or crystals (keep in the fridge or freezer respectively).

* Scissors or clippers for cutting wraps, hair matts, bandages or hair around a wound.

* Paper bandage tape

* Nail clippers

* Styptic powder (for nail trimming accidents)

* Scalpel

* Charcoal tablets or powder

* Number of the closest emergency clinic who deals with exotics, as well as the number of the closest exotic clinic should your vet be out of town.